It’s hard to believe it’s May already. And at the same time, 2020 has seemed like an eternity so far.

I’m pretty sure that means we are overdue for a party!

So…were you ordained in May? Let us celebrate you and your ministry! In these days, we can use some celebration, for sure. So, if you are celebrating a May Ordiversary, then…in the comments, tell us:

  • something you remember from your ordination service
  • something you have particularly enjoyed about ministry so far
  • something new you have learned in the course of your ministry that they “didn’t teach you in seminary”

happy ordiversary, May friends!


Teri Peterson is a minister in the Church of Scotland, currently working from underneath a 16-pound cat most days. She is a board member of RevGalBlogPals, a contributor to There’s a Woman in the Pulpit, co-author of Who’s Got Time: Spirituality for a Busy Generation, and can often be found taking pictures of the view from her manse window.


RevGalBlogPals encourages you to share our blog posts via email or social media. We do not grant permission to cut-and-paste prayers and articles without a link back to the specific post. For permission to use material in paper publications, please email revgalblogpals at gmail dot com.

5 thoughts on “May Ordiversary Party!

  1. My Ordiversary is May 15, I was ordained in 2011. I remember my friend, who was battling cancer, really dying from it coming to my ordination and telling me he would not have missed it for the world. (Tears, to this day). What I love most about ministry is the rare occasion to see a planted seed has bloomed. Just today. What they didn’t teach me in Seminary is that you can have your own literal wilderness in ministry for 16 months and counting.

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  2. I will celebrate my 15th ordiversary on May 22. When he was growing up my Dad had wanted to be a priest, but obviously and luckily that did not happen, although he remained very active in lay leadership in his church. He fully supported and encouraged my call to ministry, and he led the Call to Worship at my ordination. It was a powerful moment to see him in the pulpit as we all prepared to process into the sanctuary! What I have particularly enjoyed about ministry are the ‘Aha!’ moments–whether that is a pastoral conversation, educational event, meeting, worship planning or sermon writing, and the wisdom of the Spirit is suddenly in our midst, so that there is clarity, calm, strength, encouragement and insight. My 4 year old grandson describes my ministry as, “Your work is helping people talk to each other,” and I have recognized the truth of that young wisdom in many ways. I graduated from seminary in 2003, so what they didn’t teach then may no longer be true, but that was how to minister to people living with Alzheimer’s Disease and dementia (which has grown exponentially over the past several years), and teaching about that to clergy and laity has been a part of my ministry for the past decade.

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  3. My ordination anniversary is May 31, 1988. Hard to believe it has been 32 years. I started as a local pastor in the United Methodist church June 1, 1982. I blogged about my 30th anniversary https://revcindylee.wordpress.com/2018/05/31/here-am-i-lord-send-me/

    I was pregnant and literally waddling! I have been in ministry 38 years. I have gone from a small rural church to a large historic downtown church (one I grew up in and was confirmed in). I have gone from typewriters and mimograph machines to word processors and dot matrix printers to the internet. 

    I guarentee that seminary did not train me for a COVID 19 world! 

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