watch and pray
I don’t know about the rest of you, but as we try to plan details for Easter this year–and pivot every few days as we get more information–it feels almost as challenging (though maybe more hopeful) as a year ago when we were first beginning to figure out how to do on-line worship as we hoped to “be back on Easter.” Meanwhile, there have pretty much been sermons to give every week whether pre-recorded, via zoom, or shouted from a rooftop to people in cars (if anyone knows of someone who did this last one, I’d like photos), and there are still sermons to be preached for this Fifth Sunday in lent.

So we continue to watch and pray and hope. What word of hope will your bring to God’s people this week?

The Narrative Lectionary has Jesus and his disciples, Jesus and Zacchaeus, Jesus and the man who is blind. That discussion with some intriguing comparisons is here.

The Revised Common Lectionary seems a little mystical to me with a voice from heaven and the order of Melchizedek the Priest, the prophet Jeremiah and Psalm 51. That discussion with some interesting information about the priestly order is here.

If you are going off-lectionary or working on a series, we’d love to hear what you are doing. If you are mentioning St. Patrick, I’d love to know that (though his day is right in-between Sundays this year; anyone doing a special FaceBook or YouTube based on him today?).

If you are preparing to preach and still working on your order of worship, we offer Worship Words here.

And so, preachers, what will you say? What do your people need to hear?

Whether you are preaching Narrative Lectionary, Revised Common Lectionary, or something else altogether, we are here to help. What do you need? Sermon illustrations? Time with the Children? A way to wrap things up? People to help you untangle ideas or find commentary? Let us know; we will help as we can.

I will be checking in regularly today and tomorrow and continue checking in through Saturday night.

The photo is a picture from the “Watch and Pray” banner we use through Lent.


Wendy Lamb works as a commissioned pastor in a Presbyterian Church (USA) in Southern California and teaches college English classes at a local community college. She occasionally blogs at Bookgirl.


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6 thoughts on “11th Hour Preacher Party: Still Lent

  1. I like how my sermon started, but I feel like I got stuck at the transition to the text speaking to our time, to God’s promise for us. I also feel like I just preached this idea in a shorter devo on Eph. 2:1-8 which was for today.

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  2. I’m drifting a little off lectionary to preach on John 12:35-36. “The light is with you for a little longer…Become children of light.” So many images of Jesus as light in John’s gospel, starting from the Prologue. I can riff a little on the changes in light with Daylight Saving Time in the U.S. and go from there to talk about our needing a little more light in these still-dark days of the pandemic. I just really sense a need for a word of hope right now. Okay, to be honest, I’ve been seeking hope in my messages for the last year…because we all need it.

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    1. I love this, especially the questions, are we the crowd keeping others from seeing Jesus, not *really* seeing him ourselves. Also the earlier question, are we brave enough to ask for what we really want? Really interesting connections in these stories. –Wendy

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