Revised Common Lectionary

RCL: You Shall Be Holy

Sometimes Scripture gets a little obvious (even heavy-handed), as it does in this coming Sunday’s Revised Common Lectionary texts:

“You shall not deal falsely.
You shall not lie to one another.”
(Leviticus 19:11)

#guilty

“Do not boast about human leaders.”
(1 Corinthians 3:21)

#beentheredonethat

“You shall not profit
by the blood of your neighbor.
You shall not hate your own kin.”
(Leviticus 19:16-17)

#colonialism #capitalism
#whiteprivilege #racism

“Give to everyone who begs from you,
and do not refuse anyone
who wants to borrow from you.”
(Matthew 5:42)

#godblessthechild

“Do not deceive yourself…
for the wisdom of this world
is foolishness with God.”
(1 Corinthians 3:18-19)

#everydaystruggle

“Love your enemies.”
(Matthew 5:44)

#notevenclose

…and this doozy…

“Be perfect therefore as
your heavenly Father is perfect.”
(Matthew 5:48)

#goingbacktobed

236a8-holyHow’s that going for you, the whole “perfection” commandment? How’s it working out in your ministry to “love your enemies”? What are you experiencing in the world’s inclination to “boast in leaders” and its preference to “profit from the blood of your neighbor?”

Let’s consider those questions momentarily rhetorical.

Try this one instead:

When Scripture is so obvious, do you preach an equally straightforward sermon?

#notmycontext

However you preach such ethical admonitions as these, let’s backtrack to their theological foundation:

The LORD spoke to Moses, saying:
“Speak to all the congregation of the people
of Israel and say to them: You shall be holy
for I the LORD your God am holy.”
(Leviticus 19:1-2)

breath windowYou shall be holy — not by your own merit, not as an individual, not for the purposes of self-righteousness — but holy because you belong to God who is holy. Or, to borrow from John 15, you are within God who is holy, therefore you shall be holy because God is within you.

You shall be holy, and holiness looks like:

love of enemies,
foolishness for holy wisdom,
hearts set on God more than fear,
spirits of humility and honesty,
abundance for the poor
and welcome of the
foreigner.

#anyquestions

You shall be holy, because holiness is the way of God; holiness is Supreme Love and Divine Justice in action.

How will your sermon this week call people to model God’s holy ways? What other strains of God’s story are singing to you from this week’s RCL texts? Please add your reflections in the comments to share the work & wonder of preparing this coming Sunday’s sermon.


Rachel G. Hackenberg is a United Church of Christ minister, soccer mom, blogger, and author. Her book Sacred Pause plays with words to refresh our relationship with The Word.


RevGalBlogPals encourages you to share our blog posts via email or social media. We do not grant permission to cut-and-paste prayers and articles without a link back. For permission to use material in paper publications, please email revgalblogpals at gmail dot com.

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Revised Common Lectionary:Light Topics Edition

Will you be marking the Presentation of Jesus on Thursday – or on Sunday?light

Or are you preparing to use the Revised Common Lectionary readings for Sunday?

Either way, themes of light are shining through.

Continue reading

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RCL: Humility, Foolishness, and Blessing

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Sometimes the lectionary texts seem to speak to the heart of the struggle. I’m still wrestling with my mixed responses to the Women’s March this last weekend as I am confronted with God’s justice requirements. Reading these texts tells me that I can’t be angry when people show up for justice even if they are later to the game than I was (because I was a lot later than I should have been). I can’t be angry when people show up and still don’t fully grasp the wider issues circling around. I can’t be angry when people think that a march is all about the fun and sense of community that it produces and forget the justice issues by the time they get home. Why? Because they showed up and it isn’t too late, not really. There’s plenty of work to be done even for the late-comers and for the ones who haven’t really opened their eyes or their hearts. The work for justice never ends, right?

I read that familiar passage in Micah about what the Lord requires and I’m convicted all over again. I can’t be angry that so many folks remain oblivious to doing justice, loving kindness, and walking humbly with God because, well, I’m not always so good at it myself. As I sit in my privileged place, I see how easily I once believed that all the inequality and injustice were “normal” and, therefore, right. And how slow I was to awaken to the truth. I also see how I let anger consume and nearly destroy me and justify my poor treatment of my neighbors. And humility, the kind that allows me to be fully myself and allows others to be fully themselves, is a daily battle. God asks something of me every day that I am often reluctant to give. I must be part of the movement for justice for all people even if I get it wrong sometimes. I have to take the risk of showing up and speaking out. And when I get it wrong, I have to be willing to apologize and learn a better way. I want to live in God’s tent even when it makes me decidedly uncomfortable. How ‘bout you?

Now we come to the very familiar Gospel text, the Beatitudes. At the St. Paul, MN Women’s March this weekend, a colleague changed the list to be more inclusive and specific to the issues of today. She inspired me to come up with my own version:

Blessed are the forgotten and forsaken, the ones we walk by and overlook, for heaven will be their home.
Blessed are those mothers who rage against the deaths of their black and brown skinned children whose blood flows in our streets, for they will be comforted.
Blessed are the faithful Muslims and Jews who live under threat of hateful bombs, for they will inherit the Earth.
Blessed are those transgender, queer, and gender-nonconforming people who hunger and thirst for recognition and welcome, for they will be filled.
Blessed are the fierce ones who risk speaking truth and acting with mercy, for they will receive mercy.
Blessed are the quiet ones who show up when no one else does to speak a word of hope, for they will see God.
Blessed are the peacemakers and the justice-seekers who push us beyond what is into what needs to be, for they will be called children of God.
Blessed are those who have had hate thrown at them in Jesus’s name, for theirs will be the realm of heaven.
Blessed are you when you speak truth to power, when you step away from the center to make room for the marginalized, and when you awaken to the injustice all around you. Others will revile you, but you will be loved beyond your imagining and your reward will be immeasurable.

God’s wisdom often looks like foolishness. May we all have the courage to make fools out of ourselves for the sake of Love.

What are you thinking about these texts this week? Where is the Spirit gently leading or urgently pushing you? Please join the conversation below that we may take this journey together.


Rev. Dr. Rachael Keefe is the pastor of Living Table United Church of Christ in Minneapolis, MN. You can find links to her blog, vlog, and books at Beachtheology.com.


RevGalBlogPals encourages you to share our blog posts via email or social media. We do not grant permission to cut-and-paste prayers and articles without a link back. For permission to use material in paper publications, please email revgalblogpals at gmail dot com.


Photo: CC-BY-NC image by Rachael Keefe

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Revised Common Lectionary: Called and United

In this week’s installment of Adventures in Preaching, we who follow the Revised Common Lectionary have options of a hopeful prophesy in Isaiah (that is fulfilled by Jesus in Matthew), the calling of some of Jesus’ disciples, a Psalm expressing deep faith, and Paul preaching to the church in Corinth about unity.

Those of us in the USA might find Paul’s words to be particularly meaningful this first Sunday after the inauguration of an extraordinarily divisive man as President. How can Christians today “be united in the same mind and the same purpose”? What would that look like? And what work do we have ahead of us?

nkv94ru

Psalm 27 is one of my personal favorites to use, in its entirety, at hospital bedsides or in other situations when people are struggling. The psalmist reminds us that life isn’t always easy, but God remains with us and supports us through it all.

Matthew’s account of Jesus calling Simon and Andrew, James and John, is well-known and inspiring. What do we leave behind if we choose to be disciples of Jesus? What did Jesus mean about having them fish for people – and what does that look like for us? Somehow increasing the numbers of people on church membership lists doesn’t seem like a good enough motivation for the disciples to leave their whole livelihoods behind – Jesus must have meant something deeper than this.

In Isaiah, the prophet proclaims words of hope to a people who have experienced military defeat and oppression by the Assyrians. In Matthew, the evangelist claims that the prophesy is fulfilled in the person of Jesus. It’s worth sometimes preaching on a prophesy from the Hebrew Bible by just looking at it in its original context and considering how the people of Israel would have understood the words. With today’s combination of readings, worshippers will easily make the connection to Jesus even if the preacher stays focused on the original intent of Isaiah.

What is speaking to you this week? What do your people need to hear? Please share your ideas and stories and questions below. Blessings in your writing and your worship preparation this week.


Katya Ouchakof is co-pastor of Lake Edge Lutheran Church in Madison, WI. She blogs less often than she would like at Provocative Proclamations. She looks forward to warmer weather so that she can get back out on the water in her canoe.


RevGalBlogPals encourages you to share our blog posts via email or social media. We do not grant permission to cut-and-paste prayers and articles without a link back. For permission to use material in paper publications, please email revgalblogpals at gmail dot com.

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Revised Common Lectionary: Formed to Serve

 For what service have you been formed?

The LORD called me
before I was born.
(Isaiah 49:1)

To what work is the world calling you out of its need?

It is too light a thing that you should serve only your neighbors.
I will give you as a light to all nations; I will extend you
across the earth for the sake of my name.
(Isaiah 49:6)

How are you responding?

Then I said,
“Here I am.”
(Psalm 40:7)

How are you strengthening your heart
and letting loose with the boldness of your spirit?

I have not restrained my lips, O LORD, and
I have not hidden your saving help in my heart;
I have spoken loudly of your love and your restoration.
(Psalm 40:9-10)

In your conviction and determination,
how are you fostering curiosity
for God’s mystery at work in you?

Jesus asked them,
“What are you looking for?”
(John 1:38)

When your feet grow weary and your hope wanes,
do you throw up your hands in despair or
drop your shoulders in self-doubt?

You are not lacking in gifts
as you wait for God’s fulfillment;
surely God will strengthen you to the end.
(1 Corinthians 1:7-8)

So friends, be of good courage:
the work is hard and the way is long,
but that Restless Call is sure and
the Loving Presence is faithful.

As you reflect on the Revised Common Lectionary readings for this coming Sunday, how are you imagining you might bring these readings to life to embolden discipleship — discipleship in the pews and in the streets, at work and at home, from the local to the national to the global?

martin-luther-king-jr-quotes-8My dear white preaching colleagues in the U.S., as you prepare to preach on the Sunday before Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a loving nudge:

Is this the only time of year when you quote MLK from the pulpit? Do you have an unused Christmas gift card that you might use to diversify your bookshelves with the work of Black writers, thinkers and theologians? You don’t have to answer this next question aloud, but do you google for an MLK quotation to fit your sermon? What if you took the homiletic approach of starting your sermon preparations not with a study of ancient scripture but with a study of a modern text of Black & Womanist theologies — James Cone, Katie Cannon, Emilie Townes, so many many more! — and what if you listened to that modern text as “continuing testament” to seek the Word of God as It stirs and makes use of your particular voice to call out bold discipleship in your particular context?

For what service have you been formed, friends, and how are you being called to serve through preaching this coming Sunday? Please share and encourage one another in the comments!

 


Rachel G. Hackenberg is a United Church of Christ minister, soccer mom, blogger, and author. Her book Sacred Pause plays with words to refresh our relationship with The Word.


RevGalBlogPals encourages you to share our blog posts via email or social media. We do not grant permission to cut-and-paste prayers and articles without a link back. For permission to use material in paper publications, please email revgalblogpals at gmail dot com.

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RCL: Christmas Continues

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If we are listening, I’m quite certain we can still hear Rachel weeping for her children. It isn’t exactly what we want to be thinking about with Christmas candles still burning, though, is it? For decades I have avoided preaching on this passage from Matthew. The other texts this week are much more uplifting and lend themselves well to praise-filled sermons.

Perhaps you have chosen to lift up Isaiah’s reminder that out of “pity and love” we are saved in our distress. There’s a timeliness to a message on where redemption comes from. All throughout Advent Isaiah cautioned us about trusting human ways over holy ways and this is a clear statement that redemption doesn’t come out of human ways.

Psalm 148 could be the basis for a message filled with praise. Perhaps a reminder of all that God has done for us is appropriate as Christmas convictions begin to fade.

The Hebrews passage serves as a reminder that we are siblings in Christ, that Jesus walked among us for a reason. While I find some of the theology in this passage challenging, the message of Christ’s on-going presence with us could be reassuring as well as an invitation to walk through life more intentionally.

And now we come to the Matthew text. I will be preaching on this text, as you might have surmised. The image of Rachel weeping for her slaughtered children is one that I cannot shake. It seems to me that we still have not figured out how to protect our children from the Herods of today. It won’t be a welcome message in the midst of Christmastide, but a necessary one. The innocents of this world are still being slaughtered in Syria for sure. And in how many other places? And we who walk in the Light, what are we doing to provide safety and refuge? What has this to do with manger scenes and Christmas carols?

The Christmas story that we have cleaned up into a story for children isn’t actually that. It is a messy story with lots of risk involved. If we have indeed made it to Bethlehem to kneel before the Christ-child, then we cannot continue on in the same fashion as before. At the very least, we have to recognize with Isaiah that God redeemed us and we cannot redeem ourselves. When truly confronted with God breaking into the world, we have little choice but to sing God’s praises with the Psalmist. Similarly, when we see the fragile beauty of the babe born in Bethlehem, we are confronted with our own fragility and need for this One who will unite us as siblings, as Paul pointed out. And the ultimate risk is in recognizing that Jesus embodied so much of what the world continues to reject, if not outright slaughter. Jesus was born into a family without a home and later became a refugee, and, later still, wasn’t entirely welcome in the town where he made his home.

This story is fraught with risk. If we claim it as our own, we claim it in its fullness – from the messy, smelly, noisy birth through the flight to Egypt and everything that follows. This really isn’t a story for children. This is a story for people willing to risk kinship with the One who is the Light the world keeps trying to extinguish.

Wherever the Spirit is leading you this week, please join in the conversation so we can continue this messy, risky journey together.


Rev. Dr. Rachael Keefe is the pastor of Living Table United Church of Christ in Minneapolis, MN. You can find links to her blog, vlog, and books at Beachtheology.com.


RevGalBlogPals encourages you to share our blog posts via email or social media. We do not grant permission to cut-and-paste prayers and articles without a link back. For permission to use material in paper publications, please email revgalblogpals at gmail dot com.


Photo: CC0 image by tookapic

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Revised Common Lectionary: It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas

This weekend we celebrate the birth of Jesus! It’s an honor and blessing to proclaim one of the central stories of our faith to worshippers on Christmas Day or Christmas Eve. It is also a continual struggle for preachers – how do we proclaim such a familiar story in a way that is faithful, relevant, and not cliché? Additionally, as Christmas approaches, many of us are called upon to resolve issues regarding the placement of the tree in the worship space, or how many bulletins to print this year, or whether children should be allowed to hold candles in worship, or any number of other energy-sapping adiaphorous issues.

2013-12-23 08.40.58For the Nativity of the Lord, the Revised Common Lectionary offers three separate options. Churches with worship on both Christmas Eve and Christmas Day might choose to use different sets of readings. How did you go about selecting your readings? Some worshippers only expect to hear the birth of Jesus on Christmas– are you including any readings aside from the Gospel?

The Gospel options are Luke 2:1-20 (or selected verses) and John 1:1-14. The nativity story from Luke focuses more on shepherds and angels than on the holy family. The angel has already appeared to Mary (in Luke) and Joseph (in Matthew), and it seems that they have accepted God’s calling to parent the Messiah together. Contrary to popular belief, there is no innkeeper and no animals named in Luke’s nativity. For the preacher seeking to be faithful to the biblical witness – will you address the problems of harmonizing the Gospel accounts and adding embellishments from tradition, or let them lie another year?

John has a very different tone than Luke. Instead of the detailed dialogue and internal reflection of Luke, John brings a cosmic vision of the second person of the Trinity. The phrase “in the beginning” evokes the creation of the world, yet the reference to John grounds us firmly in a particular time and place. And while the bookend verses are hopeful and lovely, the ones in the middle remind us of our sin. Some of us have not accepted Jesus as divine. What does that mean today?

Other assigned readings come from Isaiah, the Psalms, Titus, and Hebrews. These passages are powerful. Though they do not relate the birth narrative, they do reveal more to us about who Jesus really is. Can you incorporate one or more of these readings in to your sermon for the day? Which one speaks to you most clearly?

Some other questions to consider this week:

  • What does your worship schedule look like for Christmas Eve & Christmas Day? Have you scheduled time for sleep and self-care?
  • Which Bible passages will you be using this weekend? Might you consider preaching on something other than the Gospel lesson?
  • If you plan to focus on the holy family in your sermon, how will you relate them to the present day? Will you name the conflict in Syria, and the parallels between their struggles and the holy family’s? Who else bears resemblance to Christ today, with whom your people may be able to identify?
  • How do you, personally, celebrate Christmas? Aside from leading worship, in what ways will you celebrate the birth of our savior?

Whatever your schedule for the next few days, however you choose to share the good news of Jesus’ birth, whatever other commitments or concerns you have right now, I pray that you’ll be able to find joy in the coming of the Messiah! Christmas blessings to all of you. I look forward to reading your comments and ideas.


Katya Ouchakof is co-pastor of Lake Edge Lutheran Church in Madison, WI. She blogs at Provocative Proclamations. Her Christmas list includes world peace, an end to gender-based discrimination and violence, Star Wars toys, and a good night’s sleep with nowhere to be in the morning.


RevGalBlogPals encourages you to share our blog posts via email or social media. We do not grant permission to cut-and-paste prayers and articles without a link back. For permission to use material in paper publications, please email revgalblogpals at gmail dot com.

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Revised Common Lectionary: Joy

What then did you go out to see?
Someone dressed in soft robes?
Someone reclining in comfort?
Someone with an unending smile?

What then did you expect to see
when you went looking for joy?

This coming Sunday’s Revised Common Lectionary readings combine to provide a picture of joy that — while familiar in the Advent season — is wildly unfamiliar to everyday life.

What does joy look like?

Joy looks like
a desert in bloom.
(Isaiah 35:1)

Joy looks like the tongue
of the speechless singing.
(Isaiah 35:6)

Joy looks like people
traveling together
without getting lost.
(Isaiah 35:8)

Joy looks like justice.
(Psalm 146:7)

Joy looks like freedom.
(Psalm 146:7)

Joy looks like ruin
to the wicked.
(Psalm 146:9)

Joy looks like
power deflated.
(Luke 1:52)

Joy looks like
a promise
still waiting.
(James 5:7)

Joy looks like
preparation.
(Matthew 11:10)

advent maryWhat does joy look like — for you, for your community? What does it look like for Mary, if you’re preaching on the Magnificat (Luke 1)? What does it look like for ancient Israel in a season of political crisis, if you’re preaching on Isaiah 35?

What sermonic joy is flowing from your fingers in preparation for this coming Sunday’s Advent worship? What joy is singing in your spirit or straining for new imagination? Join your joy (and your brainstorms and your worship plans) with others in the comments below as we prepare for this coming Advent Sunday.

 


Rachel G. Hackenberg is a United Church of Christ minister, soccer mom, blogger, and author. Her book Sacred Pause plays with words to refresh our relationship with The Word.


RevGalBlogPals encourages you to share our blog posts via email or social media. We do not grant permission to cut-and-paste prayers and articles without a link back. For permission to use material in paper publications, please email revgalblogpals at gmail dot com.

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Revised Common Lectionary: An ADVENTure in Justice and Peace

Revised Common Lectionary readings for the Second Sunday in Advent, Year A from Venderbilt Divinity School.

Peace.Where's the Peace?

We could all use a little peace right now.

There are battles all over the world, but the situation in Syria is especially dire. Many people live in oppression. People are protesting over lack of clean water, or fear of losing clean water. Acts of terror seem to pop up everywhere. There are threats of violence, and threats of retaliation.

Is peace without justice at best a cessation of hostilities and, at worst, the normalization of oppression?

Those of us lighting the Advent candle of Peace have Paul offering us

May the God of steadfastness and encouragement grant you to live in harmony with one another, in accordance with Christ Jesus, that together you may with one voice glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.

but are also challenged to think of peace that follows one about whom Isaiah writes

He shall not judge by what his eyes see, or decide by what his ears hear; but with righteousness he shall judge the poor, and decide with equity for the meek of the earth; he shall strike the earth with the rod of his mouth, and with the breath of his lips he shall kill the wicked.

While in Matthew, John the Baptist calls out religious leaders with

You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come?

Perhaps the resolution lies in the words of the Psalmist, who writes about justice:

Give the king your justice, O God, and your righteousness to a king’s son.
May he judge your people with righteousness, and your poor with justice.
May the mountains yield prosperity for the people, and the hills, in righteousness.
May he defend the cause of the poor of the people, give deliverance to the needy, and crush the oppressor.

I’m inclined toward the differentiation between imposing our idea of what is right (or winning) and reaching toward justice that seeks to hear, involve, and benefit all people. Okay, I’m more than just inclined: I’ve already written it into the confession for Sunday.

But I still struggle with language like “with the breath of his lips he shall kill the wicked,” “crush the oppressor,” and “every tree therefore that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire,” because we so often think we know who is wicked and who does not bear good fruit. Worse yet, we often want to help in the killing, crushing, and throwing into the fire.

How do we strive for God’s justice, when in our hearts we want to win, and punish the loser so we won’t be challenged again?

As usual, The Text This Week has some awesome resources.

The United Network for Justice & Peace in Palestine & Israel has some worship resources for Advent 2 (these are from 2013, but still year A).

Some insights on Advent 2 and peace are at Preaching Peace.

For those interested in mimetic theory, especially as it pertains to violence, there are some resources at the Girardian Lectionary.

  • Where are you headed this week?
  • Is this the Sunday of Peace for you? Or are you lighting the candle of Acceptance, Preparation, the Prophets, John the Baptist, or something else?
    • How do the readings connect with your Advent liturgy – or does it?
    • What challenges are you finding in connecting the texts with your liturgy?
  • On what resources are you leaning?

Please share your answers and, even more, your questions.


Cindi Knox is pastor of St. John’s United Church of Christ in Evanston. She blogs at RevCindi.


RevGalBlogPals encourages you to share our blog posts via email or social media. We do not grant permission to cut-and-paste prayers and articles without a link back. For permission to use material in paper publications, please email revgalblogpals at gmail dot com.

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RCL: Walking in Hope

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Advent has grown on me over the years. When I first started in ministry, it felt like an overwhelming few weeks filled with controversies – Advent Hymns or Christmas Hymns, purple or blue, children’s pageant or live nativity, and so on. I’m happy to say that Advent has changed from a time filled with extra events and programs to a liturgical season full of possibility and hope. Advent invites personal and communal seeking and celebrating. It’s an opportunity to remember that there is light that no despair can extinguish. The texts this week call our attention to the Christ who is and was and is to come.

The Isaiah text is an invitation to begin the journey to the house of God, to walk in the light of God. Here in the US, the reminder that earthly rulers are not where we find strength and hope is quite timely. God promises days to come that will be peace-filled. One day swords will become ploughshares and war among nations will be no more. Is there any more welcomed message? Yet, this message does not come without challenge. What are we doing as individuals and as congregations to ensure that we walk in the light of God and bring about this day when peace will reign?

Psalm 122 continues this theme of hope and gladness in the invitation to go to the house of God. It’s all about peace, here. Peace within the walls of the city. Peace to the people of God. The last line is the tough one, though. “For the sake of the house of the Sovereign our god, I will seek good.” It’s the personal pronoun here. I will seek your good. This is where the hope lies. What are we doing for the sake of God?

Romans continues this with a call to wake up. Of course Paul believed that Jesus would return before the end of his life and so the demand for vigilance was reasonable. How much more reasonable is it now? Now is truly the time for us to wake from sleep and see that it is well past time for us to “put on the armor of light.” In these days of increased hate crimes and public displays of racism folks need to side with hope and trust that in Christ there is a better way. Apathy and indifference will not bring about a day of peace. Waking up, acknowledging the need for Christ’s presence, and then responding to fear and hatred with hope and kindness will remind us that we are not alone. The people of God have been here before.

Of all the texts this week, Matthew is the one I find troublesome. If I can skip over the condemning passages, I would go right to the “keep awake” part. My denomination doesn’t really focus much on the Second Coming of Christ and I’m still not entirely sure what to make of it. But what I do know is that we need to be awake. We need to be agents of hope, peace, joy, and love in a world that is currently swaddled in deep darkness.

As we enter into this new liturgical year, where in these passages do you find hope? Where is the Spirit leading you? Perhaps your Advent themes are other than the traditional hope, peace, joy, and love so you might be looking at these texts with a different lens. Please join in the conversation as we begin to imagine, once again, a world filled with the light of God.


Rev. Dr. Rachael Keefe is the pastor of Living Table United Church of Christ in Minneapolis, MN. You can find links to her blog, vlog, and books at Beachtheology.com.


RevGalBlogPals encourages you to share our blog posts via email or social media. We do not grant permission to cut-and-paste prayers and articles without a link back. For permission to use material in paper publications, please email revgalblogpals at gmail dot com.


Photo: CC0 image by Gerd Altmann

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